Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine

„Debrecen Díj a Molekuláris Orvostudományért” Emlékérem és Jutalomdíj
 
A „Debrecen Díj a Molekuláris Orvostudományért” díjat a Debreceni Egyetem 2003-ban alapította a molekuláris orvostudomány területén. A díj évenkénti adományozásával a Debreceni Egyetem Általános Orvostudományi Kara az orvostudományi kutatások fejlődéséhez kiemelkedően hozzájáruló kutatókat kívánja elismerni. A díjat minden ősszel olyan nemzetközileg elismert kutató, vagy kutatócsoport kapja, akinek a munkája lényeges előrehaladást eredményezett a molekuláris orvostudomány területén. A díj összege 10.000 Euro. A jelölést az ÁOK Dékán által felkért 12 főből álló csoport végzi. A díjjal a Debreceni Egyetem Általános Orvostudományi Kara az innovatív orvosbiológiai kutatásokat és nemzetközileg kiemelkedő teljesítményeket kívánja elismerni. Az a kutató kaphatja a díjat, akinek a munkája jelentősen hozzájárult a molekuláris orvostudomány fejlődéséhez, az eredmények pedig hasznosíthatóak a korszerű betegellátásban. A díj elnyerőjének tevékenysége magában foglalja az alapkutatásokat és az új eredményekhez vezető klinikai kutatásokat, melyek jelentősen javítják a betegellátást. A díjazottak olyan kutató lehet, akinek teljesítménye és eredményei a nemzetközi kutatások élvonalába tartozik. A díjazott tetszés szerint használhatja a jutalmat, bár a jelölőbizottság reményei szerint legalább a díj egy részét a szakterülete további fejlesztésére fordítja. A díj átadására ünnepélyes keretek között, az adományozott díszelőadásával egybekötve minden év novemberében vagy decemberében Debrecenben kerül sor.
 
 
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine
The University of Debrecen has announced an international annual prize in molecular medicine in 2003. The „Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine” is offered to encourage and recognize extraordinary and sustained contributions to biomedical research. This prestigious award will be awarded by the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Debrecen each fall to a scientist, or group, whose work has lead to significant advances in the fields of molecular medicine with demonstrated benefits applied to improved patient care. The annual award will be 10,000 Euro. The nominations will be evaluated by a twelve member nomination committee comprised of preeminent medical scholars, physicians, professors and biomedical researchers.
Purpose: To encourage and recognize extraordinary and sustained contributions to improving and promoting innovative biomedical research.
Eligibility: Any scientist or group whose work has led to significant advances in the fields of molecular medicine with demonstrated benefits applied to improved patient care.
Award Criteria: This award has been created to provide international recognition to a scientist, or scientists, who have made extraordinary and sustained leadership contributions to innovative biomedical research. Each year’s Award winner will have demonstrated significant outcomes that offer medical value of international importance. Award winner activities will include basic science investigations and clinical research leading to new discoveries and improved clinical outcomes.
Those honoured will be scientists whose accomplishments and outcomes have been demonstrated with preference to accomplishments in the past decade. The recipient has full discretionary use of the Award, although it is the Award Committee’s hope that at least a portion of the award will be used to advance further positive outcomes in his or her field of expertise.
Nominations: Nominations for the Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine will be accepted through May 15. A letter of nomination must include a description of the nominee’s extraordinary or sustained contribution to innovative biomedical research. The Selection Committee also requests two additional letters of support for each nomination, as well as the curriculum vitae of each person nominated, with bibliography of important publications and articles. No self nominations will be accepted. The selection of the winner will be decided by secret vote of the Full Professors of the Faculty of Medicine.
Award Ceremony: The annual presentation of this award with an inaugural lecture will take place in November or in December, in Debrecen.

Díjazottak

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2016

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2016

Michael N. Hall

University of Basel, Switzerland

Professor Michael Nip Hall was born in Puerto Rico and grew up in South America (Venezuela, Peru). He earned a Bachelor of Science in Zoology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1976, and a PhD in Molecular Genetics from Harvard University in 1981. Michael Hall was a postdoctoral fellow at the Institut Pasteur in Paris and at the University of California, San Francisco. He was appointed an Assistant Professor at the Biozentrum (The Center for Molecular Life Sciences) of the University of Basel in 1987, and became a Full Professor in 1992. From 1995 to 1998 and from 2002 to 2009 he was head of the Division of Biochemistry, and from 2002 until 2009 was Deputy Director of the Biozentrum.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2015

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2015

Carl H. June

University of Pennsylvania, USA

 
Professor June is one of the best known researchers in the cancer research field and is among the most influential people in biopharma today.  He has made extraordinary achievements on developing anti-cancer immunotherapies and played a leading role in the successful clinical translation of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for the therapy of end-stage, refractory leukemia. He focused on developing treatments with T cells that have been genetically engineered to target cancer. These chimeric antigen receptor T cells (known as CAR T cells), are modified immune cells which have proven effective in eliminating cancer in some patients, and offer great hope for this emerging strategy in cancer immunotherapy. His groundbreaking work has demonstrated that T cells, modified in the lab to carry the antibody-like chimeric antigen receptor, can be infused back into a patient’s bloodstream, where they effectively combat cancer cells. Clinical studies of this approach have shown great efficacy. It is considered a landmark breakthrough in treating blood cancers that have stopped responding to conventional therapies. Several clinical trials involving personalized adoptive immunotherapy with autologous and allogeneic T cells are in progress. 
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2014

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2014

Sir Stephen O'Rahilly

University of Cambridge, UK

 
 
The scientific interest of Prof. O'Rahilly is centered on the etiology and pathomechanism of human metabolic and endocrine diseases with special emphasis given to translational aspects aiming at the prevention, improved diagnosis and therapy of these diseases.
Based on clinical observations he identified several genes and new pathways that are of primary importance in the development of obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. His research has been concerned with the elucidation of the basic causes of obesity and Type 2 diabetes at a molecular level and the translation of those discoveries into improved diagnosis and therapy for patients. His work has uncovered several previously unrecognised genetic causes of these diseases including some that are amenable to specific treatment. He played central role in conducting the first clinical trial with recombinant leptin for the treatment of severe obesity. As recognition for his excellent work he won many awards and in 2013 he was knighted by Queen Elisabeth II. He is member of the Royal Society, EMBO and foreign member of the US National Academy of Science.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2013

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2013

Donald M. Bers

University of California, USA

 
 
Professor Donald M. Bers made extraordinary achievements on the cellular and molecular factors that regulate heart excitation and contraction. Much of his scientific work has focused on calcium regulation in the heart, but this includes fundamental quantitative mechanistic characterization of ion transporters and channels, electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, myofilament activation, regulation of mitochondrial calcium and energetics, cellular kinase signaling, systolic dysfunction and arrhythmogenesis in hypertrophy and heart failure, always with an eye toward both integrative aspects of cardiac function with clinical relevance and identification of novel therapeutic targets in cardiovascular disease.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2012

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2012

Shigekazu Nagata

University of Kyoto, Japan

 
 
Professor Shigekazu Nagata made extraordinary achievements in discovering the first cell surface receptor, the triggering of which initiates the apoptotic cell death program in our cells. He cloned its ligand and demonstrated that the ligand can act in both membrane bound and soluble forms. He contributed to the discovery, which described that cytotoxic T cells use Fas ligand to kill virally infected and tumor cells. He described that in the absence of Fas or Fas ligand autoimmunity develops, as the Fas/Fas ligand system contributes to the inhibition of the formation of the autoimmune clones, as well as to the death of the already useless immune cells at the end of the immune response.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2011

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2011

Sir Salvador Moncada

University College London, UK

 
 
Sir Salvador Moncada made extraordinary achievements in at least three fields of biomedical science. In the 1970s he described the structure of prostacycline, which acts as an effective vasodilator and also prevents blood platelets from clumping. In 1980 an elusive 'endothelium-derived relaxing factor' (EDRF) has been shown to cause smooth muscle in the vessel walls to relax. Moncada and his team showed that EDRF was, in fact, nitric oxide, which has since become appreciated as a neurotransmitter, a modulator of inflammation and a sensor of cellular distress as well as a regulator of vessel tone.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2010

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2010

Yosef Yarden

Weizmann Institute, Israel

 
Yosef Yarden was born in 1952 in Israel. He earned his PhD degree in the Weizmann Institute in 1985, and then took various positions in US research institutions. First he worked for the Genentech Laboratory in San Francisco, later for the Massachusetts Institute for Technology. He established his own research group in 1989 at the Weizmann Institute (WI) in Rehovot. Presently he is the dean of WI's Feinberg School. A recipient of numerous awards, he has served as Secretary of the Federation of the Israel Society for Experimental Biology and is a member of both the European Molecular Biology Organization and the National Committee for Biotechnology. He published over 270 articles which received over 31,000 citations. His Hirsch index (88) places him among the finest researchers globally. Yosef Yarden studies the family of hormones known as growth factors. His research focuses on their role in the development of cancer and the mechanisms underlying their biochemical activity.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2009

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2009

Axel Ullrich

Max Planck Institute of Molecular Biology, Germany

 
 
Axel Ullrich, managing director of Max Planck Institute of Molecular Biology near Munich, is also a member of the German Academy of Natural Scientists and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the European Molecular Biology Organization, and honorary professor of several universities. Among numerous other internationally renowned honors and awards he has received the Robert Koch Prize, the Memorial Award of the American Association of Cancer Research and the Dr. Paul Janssen Award. He is one of the most frequently cited scientists in the biomedical research field. He has founded several biotechnological companies and has taken part in the development of a range of pharmaceutical products combatting cancer.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2008

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2008

Bruce M. Spiegelman

Harvard University, USA

 
 
Bruce M. Spiegelman graduated as a biologist, and earned his PhD at Princeton University. He joined the Department of Cellular Biology at Harvard Medical School in 1992, and he also works at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Professor Spiegelman's research into the formation and development of fat cells, as well as the abnormalities of glucose and fat homeostasis contributed significantly to the understanding and treatment of such widespread diseases as obesity, diabetes and other metabolic disorders. Bruce M. Spiegelman is a professor at Harvard University where he and his research team discovered PPAR gamma in 1994.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2007

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2007

Alain Fischer

Descartes University, France

 
 
Alain Fischer is a professor of pediatric immunology at Descartes University, Paris. He is Director of one of the leading European centres for immune deficiency diagnostics, therapeutics and research. He is member of the French Academy of Sciences, acting Vice-President of the Pasteur Institute, and the recipient of the internationally acknowledged Descartes award. Professor Fischer was the first to successfully employ gene therapy in treating infant babies with severe combined immune deficiency, for whom bone marrow transplantation was not available. By using a viral vector, he delivered fully functional genes into the stem-cells of the bone marrow, which in most cases transformed the dysfunctional stem-cells.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2006

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2006

Ralph M. Steinman

Rockefeller University, USA

 
Ralph Steinman was born in 1943 in Montreal. He received his medical degree magna cum laude in 1968 from Harvard Medical School. After completing his residency, he joined the Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology at Rockefeller University, where he was appointed to assistant professor, associate professor, and finally, professor in 1988. In 1995, he was granted a highly prestigious Henry
G. Kunkel award for his work in sciences. Since 1998 he has been director of the Chris Browne Center for Immunology and Immune Diseases. Dr. Steinmann is editor of internationally acknowledged scientific journals and member of their advisory boards. He is both member of and scientific advisor to several scientific organizations, institutions and foundations conducting research on AIDS, hepatitis and cancer. He is holder of honorary doctorates at several prestigious European Universities and a corresponding member of the Medical Sciences Section of the American Academy of Sciences. He discovered dendritic cells, which play a crucial role in controlling the immune system.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2005

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2005

Thomas A. Waldmann

National Institute of Health, USA

 
 
Thomas A. Waldmann was born in 1930 in New York. He received a degree in medicine from the Faculty of Medicine at Harvard University. He started to work at the National Institute of Health, where he has been the head of the immunology division of the National Cancer Institute since 1968, and director of the Metabolism Research Section since 1971. He is member of the United States National Academy of Sciences, honorary member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and one of the 40 most frequently cited scientists in the world. He discovered the interleukin-2 receptor, demonstrated its significance, and designed a molecule which could effectively block one of its subunits, thus achieving outstanding results in the treatment of T-cell leukemia.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2004

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2004

Sir Philip Cohen

University of Dundee, UK

 
 
Sir Philip Cohen was born in 1945 in Edgeware, UK. In 1969, he received his doctoral degree with distinction in biochemistry in 1969. He started working at the University of Dundee, Scotland in 1971, where he has been a professor since 1981. He has been an elected member and research professor of the British Royal Academy since 1984. Presently, he is the director of the Life Science Centre at the University of Dundee. He has been member of the European Society for Molecular Biology since 1982, and of Academia Europaea since 1990. He discovered that the reduced activity of a certain phosphatase enzyme blocks the activity of the immune system.
Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2003

Debrecen Award for Molecular Medicine 2003

J. Craig Venter

USA

 
 
Craig Venter was born on October 14th, in 1946 in Salt Lake City. He received his PhD in life sciences and pharmacology. He is the founder, president and scientific leader of Celera Genomics. He founded the Genomics Research Institute in 1992. Craig Venter played a leading role in one of the most significant scientific discoveries of mankind: the mapping of the human genome.

Hírek

Segítség a sikeres pályázatokhoz
2017 november 13. 12:59 (hétfő)
Nem bírt a Falcóval a DEAC
2017 november 13. 12:16 (hétfő)
Debreceni kutatások a V4-ek előtt
2017 november 13. 08:26 (hétfő)
Elismerések az egészségügyben
2017 november 10. 11:51 (péntek)
Bravúr kell a szombathelyiek ellen
2017 november 10. 11:32 (péntek)